Google’s HEART framework for UI metrics

In order to pick the proper feature-level metrics, exploring
Google’s HEART framework for UI metrics may be a good starting
point:

H – Happiness Metrics (like user satisfaction scores)
E – Engagement Metrics (like average visits or uses per user)
A – Adoption Metrics (like new users)
R – Retention Metrics (like churn)
T – Task Success Metrics (like form error rates)

Google’s HEART framework for UI metrics

Product Management – Summary

 

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1. Agile Methodology
a. A software development philosophy that emphasizes the development of solutions through collaboration between self-organizing and crossfunctional teams.
b. Agile Manifesto

2. Bugs, defects
a. An unintended or unexpected result or behavior in software.
b. The product manager is responsible for prioritizing the severity of the bug. Sometimes bugs are “production issues” and need to be fixed immediately while others can be shelved to be fixed at a later time.
c. Usually discovered by the Quality Assurance engineer, automated tests, the product manager or users of the product.

3. Customer Interviews
a. Also known as Customer Discovery Interviews
b. The goal is to gather the voice of the customer or user of the product.
c. This is also an opportunity to test assumptions you have about the end user and your proposed solutions for their problems.
d. Customer Development Interviews How-to: What You Should Be Learning
e. 12 Tips for Customer Development Interviews

4. Designers
a. Product Managers work with designers to create everything from the overall feel of the product to the minute details about the look and placement of buttons.

5. Developers
a. Product Managers work with developers to turn the product and designs into actual products that are usable by customers. b. Product Managers also help answer developer questions about priority of certain features or bugs and for clarity on certain product requirements as they arise throughout the development stage

6. Executive stakeholders
a. Executives at a company that have a vested interest in the success of the product that you are working on.
b. It’s important to get buy-in from executives because they often help with resource allocation and if you have an executive invested in your product then you can get things done much easier and faster.

7. Issue Tracking / Issue Tracker
a. A tool used by product managers, project managers, developers and quality assurance engineers to track the work they are making on a particular feature or bug

8. Key Performance Indicator (KPI)
a. The most important metric used to gauge the success of a product
b. Example KPIs: Revenue, User Signups, Churn Rate, Profit, Cost Savings

9. Mockups
a. Very early drafts to show the general look and some functionality of a product
b. Product managers put together mockups either themselves or work with a designer.
c. The mockups are living documents that change as the product requirements change.
d. Once the product is more fleshed out and there are much less changes to the mockups, the designer will invest time to create a high-fidelity mockup (for example, using Adobe Photoshop) which the developers use when building the product.
e. The most popular mockup tool is Balsamiq.

10. Product managers
a. Product managers lead cross-functional teams from departments like marketing, development, design and sales.
b. Product Managers are the CEO of the product.
c. Product Managers create the vision and direction for the products that they manage and then create much more detailed plans on how to turn the vision into actual product features.
d. Quora answer on: What is Product Management.

11. Product Roadmap
a. A plan put together by the product manager that prioritize and estimates release dates for the product’s features

12. Project managers
a. Product Managers work with project managers to get development work scheduled.
b. The Project Manager runs most of the meetings that the product manager and developers are in together and also helps move projects along by coordinating with the product management and development teams and removing blockers for developers.
c. Often called the Scrum Master in the Scrum Methodology.

13. Quality Assurance Engineers (QA engineers)
a. Product Managers work with QA engineers to help QA engineers test the code and features that the developers build.
b. Products are not allowed to be released if the quality assurance engineers do not sign off.

14. Scrum
a. The most popular implementation of the Agile Methodology. b. What is Scrum?

15. Stories
a. Also known as User Stories
b. A requirement document in Agile Methodology.
c. Different than the typical “requirements document” in that rather than talking about specific technical requirements, user stories are conversational sentences around the desired functionality.

16. Story Points
a. Story Points are assigned to User Stories.
b. Story Points are assigned by the developers working on the project and convey the level of effort they think is required to complete the particular user story.

17. Usability Testing
a. Usually performed by a User Experience Researcher or a combination of the Product Manager and Designer.
b. The goal is to evaluate a product by putting it in the hands of real users and observing the way they interact with the product.
c. Often times usability tests will give a user a specific task and then observe how the user completes the task, where they get confused and need help.
d. The output of a usability test is to uncover missing features, unused features, and points of confusion

18. User Experience
a. The overall experience that a user has with a product.
b. UX includes UI.

19. User Interface
a. The way the user interacts with the product.
b. The simplest case are the buttons and forms on a website.
c. User Interface is a combination of the ‘look and feel’ of the product and ‘how it works’.
d. The User Interface is heavily informed and guided by the User Experience research.

20. User Persona
a. A type of person that will use the product.
b. It’s an imaginary user that has a specific behavior, attitude and goal.
c. User stories should be created with user personas in mind.

Product Management – Summary

Product Manager – Tools

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The most successful product managers are organized so that your thoughts can be organized. If you have an organized mind you can communicate more clearly and being a great communicator is the key to success as a product manager.

If you aren’t naturally talented at communicating, you can go very far by focusing on being organized.

The best way to stay organized is to rely on tools to help you do the job.

Here are all the types of tools that most product managers have in their toolbelt and suggestions for apps and websites for each type of tool.

Feature and Bug Tracking

Sometimes also referred to as “issue tracker” or “issue tracking” tools. These are software applications that are used to keep a backlog of features that the product management team wants to create, the developers are in the middle of creating, or are created.

Usually a feature tracking tool integrates functionality to track bugs that are reported either internally or externally by users.

Roadmap Planning

Roadmapping helps you plan out your product’s features over the course of months and even years. It’s important to keep an organized roadmap using a roadmap planner so you can get a high level view of what features need to be implemented and when they can be implemented.

As a product manager you’ll be referring to the roadmap frequently when internal stakeholders (like executives and sales people) and clients want an idea of what’s to come.

Wireframing

Wireframing is essentially a draft or a sketch of the feature or product that you’re building. You can use these wireframes to validate the feature or product before it get’s built and also to communicate how you want the product or feature to work and look to your developers.

Multi-Purpose Product Management Tools

Product Manager – Tools

Product Management – Removing Zombie Features

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Usually no body thinks of removing old features which are not much used . Reason is mostly as we always concentrate on new and revenue generating features. Knowing the value by removing a old feature not in use is not thought about much.

There might be many good or bad reasons for remiving a old feature. Some of them which cross my mind are:

1. Simplified customer experience

Additional modules or menu items or settings make it difficult for new customers to find what is important. Even for experienced customers, every additional option adds “cognitive load” and makes a service feel less delightful, and more like work.

2. Reduced “load time” and increased speed of the servic

Sites with fast page load have higher conversion rates and more love from Google for search ranking. Most importantly, fast sites and apps respect our customers’ valuable time.

But, you may say, why not just hide the features for new or casual customers, or move them somewhere that only power users will see them? Unfortunately, doing so wouldn’t accomplish these other benefits:

3. Improved stability and reliability

Features introduce bugs unless they are regularly tested. The funny thing about software is that it often is intertwined in ways that make the consequences of changes difficult to predict. A decade ago, software companies would have employed armies of QA testers to do end to end tests on an app before releasing changes. The world is different now: we leverage test automation in addition to focused QA testing, and we move faster and introduce more innovations to market. However, despite best efforts, unintended consequences pop up, which take time and effort to diagnose and resolve.

4. Improved ability to innovate

Features add to code (software) complexity, and thus slow our ability to build or fix what is most important.

5. Ease of hiring and training new developers

Simpler code results in a lower learning curve.

6. Lowered cost of technology upgrades

When companies upgrade their underlying technology, features often need to be rebuilt. While I was at Urbanspoon, we upgraded the website to be responsive (so that our pages resize gracefully for tablets and phones). This required many if not all of our website features to be rebuilt.

However before you proceed make sure you have

  • segmented your usage data
  • informed and spoken to your most local and vocal customers
  • tested thoroughly
  • removed features in groups – impact is lesser

 

Product Management – Removing Zombie Features

5 Awesome Data Analytics tools

  1. Segment  – Collect customer data with one API and send it to hundreds of tools for analytics, marketing, and data warehousing.
  2. Zendesk – Zendesk makes it easy to support customers when they need your help. Zendesk also makes it easy for them to help themselves when they don’t.
  3. Stripe – Stripe is a suite of APIs that powers commerce for businesses of all sizes.
  4. Mixpanel – World’s most advanced mobile & web analytics.
  5. MailChimp – Online email marketing solution to manage subscribers, send emails, and track results. Offers integrations with other programs.

 

5 Awesome Data Analytics tools